Tag Archives: rodamientos

Maryhill Festival of Speed 2011

All in a day’s work… On Sunday July 3, Seismic wheels and bearings took 2nd place in Men’s Open Downhill at the Maryhill Festival of Speed (Tim Del Rosario), took 3rd place in the Junior Downhill at Maryhill (Austin Joseph Nicassio), and also 3rd in Street Luge (Christian Conaway). Congrats to all!

After Maryhill, we had a chance to catch up with Austin Joseph Nicassio and find out how our 76 mm Purple Hot Spots performed throughout the event:

“The best thing for me was their acceleration in and out of turns, the performance core complimented the outstanding rebound of the black opps urethane that created the exit speeds necessary for racing and advancing on the Maryhill Loops Road. Along with the core helping exit speeds, it also kept my wheel lips stronger which allowed me to have a more firm yet smaller contact patch and intern still offer more grip for more nimble and faster racing lines than my opponents.”

Podium Maryhill 2011

Podium Maryhill 2011

 

 

 

 

Podium Maryhill 2011

Podium Maryhill 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by: Scott Wippermann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seismic Prototype Wheels Video

Mischo Erban & the rest of the GMR team thrashing some Seismic Prototype wheels.

The Dark Side – GMR Team Edit from GMR Longboards / Ronin Trucks on Vimeo.

 

7th Annual Vernon Downhill IGSA North American Championships

Seismic Skate Systems will be one of the lead sponsors for the 7th Annual Vernon Downhill IGSA North American Championships!

7th Anual Vernon Downhill Poster

The 7th annual Vernon Downhill is also the IGSA North American Championships for the third consecutive year in 2011. Vernon, BC is the place to be June 11-12 to see the best downhill skateboarders in North America battling it out for the championship.

Taking place in the residential neighborhood of Middleton Mountain in Vernon, BC, the race is unique by running through a residential neighborhood. Extremely kind and co-operative residents have allowed us to have this unique experience of racing down their local streets.

Track Facts
Course Length: 1.2 km (.8 mi)
Top Speed:
Qualifying Records
Downhill Skateboard: 55.094      Kevin Riemer (2010)
Street Luge:              57.846     Kolby Parks (2010)
Classic Luge:           1:02.125   Kolby Parks (2010)Previous Winners
Downhill Skateboard Winners
2010  Kevin Riemer, CAN
2009  Mischo Erban, CAN
2008  Thomas Edstrand, CANWomen’s Downhill Skateboard Winners
2010  Brianne Davies, CAN
2009  Brianne Davies, CAN
2008  Haven Anderson, CAN

Junior 1 Downhill Skateboard Winners
2010  Quinn Dubois, CAN

Junior 2 Downhill Skateboard Winners
2010  Alex Tongue, USA
2009  Spencer Smith, USA
2008  Spencer Smith, USA

Street Luge Winners
2010  William Condon, CAN
2009  William Condon, CAN

Classic Luge Winners
2010  William Condon, CAN

More details:  www.VernonDH.com
Contact: Mischo Erban

Location:

Vernon Downhill June 11-12 2011

Seismic Skate: Team Riders Proto Testing new freeride wheels

New Freeride wheels prototypes are here!

Screen shot 2013-07-30 at 13.10.19

Check out this Rad video from Team riders Stephan Reinhardt, Mark Riley, Nick Delgado, and Nate Ryan hit the streets of Boulder, Colorado on their longboards to test the prototype Seismic 75mm double-radius wheels  in the new Seismic freeride formula. Stephan even got a chance to ride a prototype Seismic 36-inch double kick!

These wheels allow you to do really smooth and consistent slides. They are really controllable and they will easily allow you to pull out standies. They also leave thick thane lines.

These wheels are poured in Seismic’s Elixir Urethane. A formula designed specifically for modern freeride. Coming out soon, stay tunned!!!

Seismic introduces Tekton™ bearings

The bearing behind the Official IGSA Downhill Speed World Record!

Tekton Bearings

Boulder, CO – After more than two years in development, Seismic is proud to unveil the patent-pending Tekton™ bearing – the bearing behind the Official IGSA Downhill Speed World Record. (Click here to witness the awesome feat on YouTube.)

Said 2009 World Cup Champion Mischo Erban, who set the new record of 80.83mph last fall, “Tekton bearings roll fast, hold alignment better and stay cleaner, longer. It’s that simple!”

“The difference is the wide flange at the ends of the integrated half-spacers,” said Seismic founder/owner Dan Gesmer. “The big, flat contact surfaces square up, co-align and self-stabilize inside your wheels.”

“Once coupled, the Tektons literally block themselves from sitting or rocking out of alignment, so they stay straighter than any other bearing system ever,” Gesmer added. “Your wheels roll faster with better control, while the bearings last longer and stay quieter!”

According to Neil Sload of Focus Supply, one of the world’s leading suppliers of bearings to top pro skateboard brands, “The Seismic Tekton is by far the most technical skateboard bearing I’ve ever seen produced.”

“It wasn’t easy to find a bearing factory capable of manufacturing this design,” Gesmer continued. “The integral flanged half-spacers need to be custom-machined, not just cut from a stock steel tube.”

Tekton Bearings

Tektons should not be confused with bearings that have their inner races stretched on one side to form a simple half-spacer. Sometimes called “industrial” bearings, these have been used in pre-assembled skateboards since the 1970s, and more recently for racing, but they’re still vulnerable to misalignment.

The diameter of the Tektons’ flanged contact surfaces is up to 35% larger compared to bearings coupled with floating spacers, and up to 23% larger compared to bearings with stretched inner races. This translates to exponentially better correction for flaws in bearing seat levelness, bearing seat spacing, axle diameter and axle straightness.

“I have total confidence in their ability to push extreme speeds – 80mph and beyond!” said Erban.

Tekton bearings, rated at ABEC-7, are precisely dimensioned to provide superior alignment safeguards in all modern high-performance skateboard wheels. Features include steel balls, nylon retainers, black outer casing, removable rubber-coated steel seals with printed graphic, and a proprietary lubricant combining both oil and grease.

The inner race is stepped underneath the seal to resist contamination, and it’s stepped between the bearing and the flange to save weight. (A set of Tektons weighs the same as a set of conventional bearings with simple floating spacers.) On the side opposite the flange, the inner race extends 0.5mm to form a thin integrated washer.Tekton Bearings

Like all Seismic wheels, trucks, and decks, Tekton bearings are available from finer skate stores and online at www.seismicskate.com. No bearing spacers, axle washers, or World Record budgets required.

For further information, contact info@seismicskate.com. Stay tuned this year for more startling innovations in trucks, boards and wheels from Seismic!

Mischo Erban Makes Headlines on ESPN – Speed Record Set in Colorado

Written By Devon O’Neil
Photo By Travis Conklin
ESPN Action Sports
October 20, 2010, 1:33 PM ET

 

British Columbia's Mischo Erban, en route to a new world record for speed on a skateboard.

British Columbia’s Mischo Erban, en route to a new world record for speed on a skateboard.

The last day of September, on a secret, two-lane county road in northern Colorado, downhill skateboarder Mischo Erban was clocked bombing a hill at 80.83 mph, the highest recorded speed on a skateboard in history.

The news and corresponding YouTube video spread like poison ivy among the downhill community but made little impact beyond — a fitting response for a sport that, in cases like this, can best be compared to drag racing.

Erban, 27, the reigning World Cup downhill champion, was aided by three visual spotters who used hand signals (not radios) to warn of a car driving uphill and thus alert Erban to stay in his lane on the twisting mountain course, which started at 8,000 feet and dropped 670 feet in a mile. Its average grade, 12.7 percent, was steeper than most Tour de France climbs.

“The stars really did align with how this road was built,” allowed Erban, though he wouldn’t disclose its specific location. “It’s like a marble countertop; perfect for what we do.”

Erban hit 80.83 mph on his 19th of 20 runs, clocked by a Tag Heuer timing system known as a “speed trap” that he borrowed from the president of the International Gravity Sports Association. The system measured Erban’s time between two photo cells 100 feet apart, then converted that to a speed more precise than those recorded by GPS units or radar guns.

The world governing body had a representative in attendance, Gary Fluitt, and recognized Erban’s speed as a new world record. Whether Guinness will is still in question.

The man and his machine.

The man and his machine.

Initially, Erban — who flew from his home in Vernon, British Columbia, to bomb the hill — took some heat from local downhillers who were angry he didn’t alert them of his runs in advance. So he declined to pursue the Guinness distinction. He also wasn’t sure what he needed to do to get it.

But according to Guinness spokeswoman Sara Wilcox, Erban’s timing system and witnesses meet the standards required for a world record. When notified of this Tuesday, Erban said he’d submit a claim to Guinness after all. The current record is held by Brazilian Douglas da Silva, who was clocked more than 10 mph slower (70.21 mph) in October 2007.

Erban already makes an unlikely world record holder. Born in Prague, he lived there until he was 2, when his parents fled “the strict control of communism,” he said. “There wasn’t much freedom.” They settled in British Columbia and Erban now lives halfway up the twisting road to Silver Star Mountain Resort.

He won his first downhill race in 2005, two years after he picked up the sport. Now, at 6-foot-2 and 190 pounds, he competes on a World Cup circuit that stops in 10 countries. “People fear him on a race course,” IGSA president Marcus Rietema said.

Even among top racers, downhill skateboarding still operates largely underground. Take the secret site in Colorado: A few years back, some locals bombed it and posted on the Internet speeds in the mid-to-upper 70s (mph), much faster than the official world record. As Erban tells it, one of those locals soon asked some pros if they’d like to come run the hill, and its reputation grew.

Erban got his first shot last year (or the year before; he can’t recall), recording a speed of 74.5 mph but narrowly avoiding a head-on collision with a police car that pulled out of a vacant parking lot. The cop turned into the uphill lane as Erban blew by in the downhill lane, causing the incensed officer to U-turn and chase Erban to his stopping point.

“He said if he caught us idiots again he’d charge us with reckless endangerment,” recalled Erban, who once splatted onto the pavement at 57 mph.

Undeterred, Erban returned in September to do some test runs with his sponsor, Boulder, Colo.-based Seismic Wheels, in front of eight people. After whizzing through the speed trap on his 40 ½-inch, self-designed GMR board, he’d stand up from his tuck and hold out his arms for four-tenths of a mile on flat asphalt, eventually stepping off at a near stop.

The day wasn’t without a close call, however. Not long after Erban set the record, a cop showed up. “He’d gotten the call about us earlier in the day but he was busy with something else,” Erban said. “We got lucky.”

Asked what it feels like to go that fast on a skateboard, Erban replied: “It’s surreal. I know I’m in control the whole way, so you have, like, this calm; and you also have this raw power pushing you down the hill at 80 mph. But it’s so smooth that you could be thinking about what you’re going to have for lunch.”

Skateboarding Blog | ESPN Action Sports